Foundation Repair Stafford Texas

freeway-trafficIn 1820, when the land that is now Texas was under the rule of Spain, Stephen F. Austin took advantage of a Spanish offer to settle a vast area of the territory in exchange for expansive land grants. William J. Stafford became intrigued with the offer and was one of Austin’s “Old 300” families that made the migration west and settled here.
In 1824, Stafford was granted a league-and-a-half of land, which became known as Stafford’s Point, and aided by a horse-powered cotton gin, began farming on his plantation and operating the gin to bale his and other farmers’ crops in the area. It marked the beginning of the business friendly climate that remains as a trademark of Stafford today.
The prominence and influence of Stafford’s Point flourished until 1836, when General Santa Ana, leading the Mexican Army, continued his invasion of Texas. After overrunning the Alamo in San Antonio, he headed for San Jacinto. He and his troops stopped in Stafford’s Point for the night, and before departing on their incursion, pillaged and burned this thriving community.
By 1840, settlers had returned to begin to rebuild the town. Sugar cane was gaining in stature as the preferred economic product and replaced cotton as the primary source of income for the revitalizing economy. Attracted by this expanding community, Stafford´s Point became the terminal point of the first railroad tracks built in Texas. On September 1, 1853, the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railroad made its maiden twenty mile trip from Harrisburg to Stafford’s Point. After a couple of years, the rails were extended westerly. Today, there are over 12,000 miles of railroad tracks in Texas.
The Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation resulted in a dynamic shift in the direction and economy of the area. By 1869, a U.S. Post Office was established bearing the new name of Stafford. Freed slaves, who established numerous small farms, became the dominant landowners. By the turn of the century, the population rose to around 300, but then began a significant decline. By 1914, only about 100 people called Stafford home.
Over the next four decades, immigrants turned the tide and began to filter in. Led by a contingency of Italians looking for both business and farming opportunities, the future of Stafford began to take shape. However, sandwiched in was a raucous and, in retrospect, somewhat humorous period during the infamous Prohibition Era which featured widespread bootlegging and gambling that gave the town an image throughout the area that is still remembered with a wry smile by some of the surviving old-timers.

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A History of Stafford

In 1824, Stafford was granted a league-and-a-half of land, which became known as Stafford’s Point, and aided by a horse-powered cotton gin, began farming on his plantation and operating the gin to bale his and other farmers’ crops in the area. It marked the beginning of the business friendly climate that remains as a trademark of Stafford today.

The prominence and influence of Stafford’s Point flourished until 1836, when General Santa Ana, leading the Mexican Army, continued his invasion of Texas. After overrunning the Alamo in San Antonio, he headed for San Jacinto. He and his troops stopped in Stafford’s Point for the night, and before departing on their incursion, pillaged and burned this thriving community.

By 1840, settlers had returned to begin to rebuild the town. Sugar cane was gaining in stature as the preferred economic product and replaced cotton as the primary source of income for the revitalizing economy. Attracted by this expanding community, Stafford´s Point became the terminal point of the first railroad tracks built in Texas. On September 1, 1853, the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railroad made its maiden twenty mile trip from Harrisburg to Stafford’s Point. After a couple of years, the rails were extended westerly. Today, there are over 12,000 miles of railroad tracks in Texas.

The Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation resulted in a dynamic shift in the direction and economy of the area. By 1869, a U.S. Post Office was established bearing the new name of Stafford. Freed slaves, who established numerous small farms, became the dominant landowners. By the turn of the century, the population rose to around 300, but then began a significant decline. By 1914, only about 100 people called Stafford home.